Viewing post categorized under: Retail and fashion Law

The Butterfly Effect

Sharon Givoni Consulting Retail and fashion Law

Detailed prints are always going to be popular for dresses, but what happens if a label comes up with a design in-house and then finds the same print used by another garment label? This happened to Australian fashion label Ladakh recently when it discovered Quick Fashion Pty Ltd selling similar patterned dresses under its “Sweetacacia” […]

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Celebrity Endorsement – Navigating the Minefield

Sharon Givoni Consulting Retail and fashion Law

Using images, names or likenesses of the rich and famous for promotional purposes whether in fashion or otherwise, can undoubtedly create a powerful endorsement of your brand… as long as you’re aware of the risks and traps to avoid. This article looks at this issue taking into account the Rihanna t-shirt case that went to […]

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Protecting textile patterns and designs

Sharon Givoni Consulting Arts and design, Copyright, Retail and fashion Law, Trade marks

If you design or manufacture patterned textiles or fabrics, you need to be careful not to copy other people’s textile designs and find yourself entangled in legal issues. This article talks about copyright and trade mark protection of patterns, trade marks and designs in textiles (including David Jones, Louis Vuitton and Levis). Read more… Note […]

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Brand protection for designers

Sharon Givoni Consulting Retail and fashion Law, Trade marks

While imitation may well be the greatest form of flattery it is certainly not much fun when it is your garment or brand name that is copied by others. In this article Sharon Givoni covers what makes a strong trade mark from a trade marks perspective, some considerations if you expanding your fashion label internationally […]

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Would the real Zara please stand up? by Sharon Givoni
Jun / 04

Would the real Zara please stand up?

Sharon Givoni Consulting Retail and fashion Law, Trade marks

Many textile and fashion designers use, or incorporate their own name into their brands. Take Zara, Davenport, Elle McPherson and Collette Dinnigan to name a few. The more unique the fashion label is, usually the safer you are from “copycats”. However, legal battles can arise if two designers use similar names. Read more… Note the […]

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